The smoothest golf swings always appear as one fluid motion. While all golfers have a distinctly unique golf swing, the best ball strikers have the same sequence of movement from start to finish. Research has shown that the most efficient method of putting the golf ball into play is by beginning the downswing with the lower body leading, and the upper body and arms following along for the ride. All of these things occur in a very short amount of time, and in order for the swing sequence to occur this quickly and in a coordinated manner, a player must have proper control of their body.

In the first half of the golf swing, the body needs to separate its upper and lower halves in order to produce the tension our muscles need to “fire”. The greater the separation of these halves, the more likely a player is to create a powerful downswing. However, inhibitions in the core muscles, such as the abdominals and glutes, may prevent a player from rotating and separating correctly. This in turn may throw off their sequencing and most likely create compensations in technique. Along with the potential inability to separate, golfers may become weaker on their right or left sides due to repeated motions to the same side of the body. These dysfunctions may be demonstrated during certain exercise tests, such as rolling patterns. Rolling patterns are developmental exercises utilized to improve muscle activation and contraction sequences of the upper and lower body. They are also as simple as they sound: rolling from your back onto your chest, and rolling from your chest onto your back. These patterns help detect deficiencies in a player’s movement pattern, as well as any asymmetries on one side of the body compared to the other.

These rolling patterns, simple as they may seem, can help determine whether or not there is a lack of strength in the player’s core, joint tightness, or deficiency in motor control. As children, we learn to get from one place to another by any means necessary, and one of the first movements we are able to make is by lifting our head and rolling from side to side. At birth we are innately given the ability to properly separate our upper and lower body, but over time we lose that, possibly due to injury, joint tightness, or muscle weakness. This may make a movement such as rolling much more difficult than it is. Since golf is a rotational sport, a player must have the ability to coordinate movement from one side to another, and it is important to help a player develop the proper muscle control needed for their swing.

There are four different rolling patterns we like to use here at FitGolf: upper body face-up, upper body face-down, and lower body face-up and face-down. Let’s try a lower body roll, facing-up: Lie on your back with legs extended and your shoulders fully extended over your head on the ground. Now try to roll your body to face down position starting with your right leg only. Try not to use your upper body. Repeat on the other side. For an upper body roll in the same position, we want to lie on your back with your legs extended and your shoulders fully extended over your head on the ground. Now try and roll your body to the face down position starting with your right arm only. Try not to use your lower body. Repeat on other side.

Give these exercises a try at home, and try to determine how well you can separate your upper and lower body in both rolling and golf. If you have any questions about rolling patterns or separation in the golf swing, please contact me at [email protected] .

Dominic Seelig, CSCS, TPI Certified Level 1

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