Working out is difficult enough. The workout planning should not be just as hard.

Dan John wrote an interesting theory about the amount of free will one possesses as it relates to energies. Through day to day life, we make many decisions. Everything from what time should I need to wake up, what should I wear today, to do I eat the healthy salad for lunch or the delicious greasy cheeseburger. All of these decisions require a bit of free will. After a long day of tapping into the free will reserves, some of the decisions that follow become questionable.

One way we can we maximize free will is to plan for those routine decisions. Plan for what you are going to wear by lying out the outfit the night before, prepare meals for the entire week, and create a workout plan to follow. Do the hard work while you have the free will left to give. Spend an hour and plan out the next 4-6 weeks of training. Set a schedule, pick the exercise order, and execute the plan. I have laid out a simple schedule of training that I currently use as it fits in with my work schedule. See the notes below to see how those training workouts are laid out.

Workout Schedule

Monday: Weight/Cardio Training

Tuesday: Rest/Recovery

Wednesday: Weight/Cardio Training

Thursday: Rest and Recovery

Friday: Rehab/Movement Training

Saturday: Heavy Weight Training

Sunday: Rest/Recovery

 

Workout Notes

For the training days, circuit training is a good place to begin. Pick one exercise for each category below:

Push – Bench press, push up, etc.

Pull – Row, Standing T’s, etc.

Lateral – Side steps, side plank, etc.

Skill – Sport specific movement (ex. Fast club swings for golf)

Core – Any abdominal will do, get creative.

Perform each exercise in order, rest for 1 minute, and repeat a number of cycles or complete for an amount of time. Again, keep it simple. I like a simple plan not only for the sake of mental effort, but to be able to look back and see what exercises gave you the outcomes that you were looking for. If you are not reaching your goals in your workouts after 4-6 weeks, its time for a change. 

Keep it simple. Make it repeatable. Change things up every 4-6 weeks. Follow this format to creating more free will for other decisions in your day.

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